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Journal of Holistic Healthcare 2004-2005

  Issue 2.4 - Nov 2005
Mental health issue Dumping Descartes and bringing 'mental' into the mainstream - Edward: shot in his own interest - Techno-totalitarianism and the therapeutic dance - Creativity and mental distress: the true links - Alternative treatments for depression: Light and St John's Wort...


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  Issue 2.3 - Aug 2005
Spirituality issue Holy work - spirituality and healthcare in transition - Being mindful, easing suffering - Is spirituality the preserve of hospital chaplains? - Learning values in healthcare? - What does it mean to be ill? Spirituality and the meaning of illness...


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  Issue 2.2 - May 2005
Nursing issue Time for a story: integrated healthcare at the Peninsula - Alternative treatments for depression - exercise and 'wake' therapy - Holism: the symphony of health - Holistic woman - centred maternity care: are we achieving it?...

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  Issue 2.1 - March 2005
Examining 21st century expectations of healthcare - BHMA conference reports Does personal care and continuity matter in today's NHS - Why we need a new model for 21st century healthcare - Making holistic medical education happen - Practical applied psycho-neuroimmunology, the endorphin effect...

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  Issue 1.3 - Nov 2004
Nigel's list: A holistic parable - Cortisol as a biomarker of stress - Beyond mind-body dualism: implications for patient care - Cuba's green medicine, The balm on the Achilles heel of Castro's revolution - The T'ai Chi balancing act - Diversity in the public arena: a crucial issue for holistic healthcare...

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  Issue 1.2 - Aug 2004
Integrative care at Glasgow Homoeopathic Hospital - The dangers and limitations of modern biomedical research - CAM regulation: integration or disintegration? - The reflective practitioner in a community of enquiry: case study designs - Emergent entanglement, love and being...

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  Issue 1.1 - May 2004
The human effect - Holism and interprofessional learning - Survival skills for health professionals and their families - Carson's syndrome - The new GP contract - How CAM helps at acute cancer hospital...

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2011-2010  |  2009-2008  | 2007-2006 | 2005-2004 





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Journal of Holistic Healthcare
Issue 2.4 - November 2005
 

Dumping Descartes and bringing 'mental' into the mainstream
Dr Chris Manning CEO PriMHE

'In proportion to our body mass, our brain is three times as large as that of our nearest relatives. This huge organ is dangerous and painful to give birth to, expensive to build and, in a resting human, uses about 20% of the body's energy even though it is just 2% of the body's weight. There must be some reason for all this evolutionary expense'. Dame Professor Susan Blakemore. 'There are about ten billion neurons in the brain? if you were to count the number of connections (synapses) in your grey matter cortex (the mantle of nerve cells covering the brain's surface) at the rate of one connection a second, you would finish counting them some 32 billion years after you began? a large match head's worth of your brain contains about a billion connections. If we consider how connections might be variously combined, the number would be hyperastronomical on the order of ten followed by millions of zeros (there are about ten followed by eighty zeros' worth of positively charged particles in the whole known universe)'. Nobel Scientist Gerald Edelman.

 

Edward: shot in his own interest - Technototalitarianism and the therapeutic dance
David Zigmond MB, ChB, MRCGP, DPM Liaison Psychiatrist at the Hammersmith Hospital and Principal GP in Bermondsey, London

No summary was offered by the author who wrote to the editor: 'It's rather long and seems a bit complicated. I don't really understand it all? anyway I wrote it months ago'.

 

Creativity and mental distress: the true links
Peter Linnett FAETC, MSA Freelance writer and tutor

'Creativity' and 'mental distress' (or 'madness') have been linked historically in ways that are at best dubious, at worst harmful.The true links are much more complex. The most fruitful connections for the future should lie in reaching a much deeper understanding of mental distress; developing creative treatments and services that genuinely help people; and creating real partnerships between health workers, patients and researchers.

 

Alternative treatments for depression Light and St John's Wort
James Hawkins MB, B. Chir

When all depressive subtypes are included, more than 1 in 3 of us is likely to have qualified for a depression diagnosis by our mid 30s.1 All these depression subtypes are associated with significant suffering as well as disturbance in work and social functioning. This is true too for the even commoner subthreshold disorders.2, 3 This article explores the value of light therapies and St John's wort for these widespread difficulties.

 

Tuning in to our natural endowment: the human givens
Ivan Tyrell

In this article we introduce the human givens approach to psychotherapy and education. Its scientific heritage is drawn from strands of psychology, psychiatry, neuroscience, sociology, anthropology and the more effective therapies, as well as knowledge accumulated outside of those disciplines in the wisdom traditions (which have, of course, existed for thousands of years in most cultures). Where it is being adopted, the human givens approach is having a spectacular impact on how distressed people are helped.

 

Hartlepool MIND holistic mental health in action
Dr Ian Walton MB BS, MRCGP Hartlepool

MIND is achieving truly startling results, rehabilitating patients back into the community using mental resources many of them didn't know they had. Their success rate is one to be envied nationwide and their methods are inventive. Here we visit the practice and explain how they do it.

 

Treating tsunami survivors for trauma The effectiveness of a short-term psycho-physiological trauma treatment approach among South Asian tsunami survivors
Raja Selvam Ph.D.

A short-term psychophysiological approach to trauma treatment was used to treat more than 200 adults and 50 children for symptoms of trauma from the Indian ocean tsunami of 2004. The treatments were offered to tsunami survivors from 13 fishing villages in Tamil Nadu, India, six months after the tsunami. Initial findings from follow-up research conducted four weeks after treatments indicate significant reduction in trauma symptoms in a majority of adults treated, even with single treatments.

 

 

 

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Journal of Holistic Healthcare
Issue 2.3 - August 2005
 

Holy work ? spirituality and healthcare in transition                         Rev Prof Stephen G Wright FRCN, MBE Faculty of Health and Social Care, St. Martin?s College, Lancaster; Editor, Spirituality and Health International; Chairman,The Sacred Space Foundation

There is growing evidence that spirituality is of immense significance to wellbeing. Spirituality, long ignored or limited to checking the patient's religion and notifying the chaplain, is now increasingly being seen as central to the healing process. Spirituality underpins what has come to be known as 'holistic milieu' and there is evidence that a massive turn is occurring in our culture that is pushing back the boundaries of how spirituality is included in healthcare. This is having an enormous impact.

 

Being mindful, easing suffering                                           Christopher Johns RN, PhD, MPACT

University of Luton The text represents the author's reflection on everyday experience with the intent to reveal the way reflection can open up the potential to learn through experience, especially learning to respond effectively within complex issues of clinical practice that have no easy answers to the problems they pose.

 

Is spirituality the preserve of hospital chaplains?                            The Reverend Alan Brown OblCR School of Healthcare, University of Leeds

Why hospitals employ chaplains is often a mystery to people working in healthcare. This is a potted history of the role of hospital chaplain; the workings of the churches, primarily the Church of England, over the last century on the meaning of spirituality as it relates to health; the changing nature of our cultural and spiritual environments; and the contribution which the chaplain can make to the wider healthcare team.

 

Learning values in healthcare?                                                  Sarah Eagger MB BS, MRCPsych Consultant psychiatrist; honorary senior lecturer, Imperial College School of Medicine Arnold Desser BA (Hons), CAc (China), MBAcC Senior lecturer, School of Integrated Health, University of Westminster, London Craig Brown.MB Chb MRCGP General Practitioner 

A review of Values in healthcare: a spiritual approach has appeared in a previous issue of the Journal of Holistic Healthcare and addresses the issues of teaching spirituality in healthcare.1 It is a personal and team development programme supporting the personal wellbeing of practitioners through the identification and expression of their core values. In this article the authors describe the background, inspiration and underlying principles of the pack.

 

What does it mean to be ill? Spirituality and the meaning of illness Professor John Swinton PhD, BD, RNM, RNMH Professor of Practical Theology and Pastoral Care, University of Aberdeen; Honorary Professor of Nursing, Centre for Advanced Studies in Nursing, University of Aberdeen

In this paper we will explore the significance of the meaning of illness with a particular focus on the importance of spirituality for enabling a deeper understanding of the lived experience of health and illness.

 

 

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Journal of Holistic Healthcare
Issue 2.2 - May 2005
 

Time for a story: integrated healthcare at the Peninsula
Simon Mills MA, FNIMH, MCPP

Teaching Fellow in Integrated Healthcare The Peninsula Medical School has the first MSc in integrated healthcare at a UK medical school. Why there and why now? This article charts the rise and rise of integrated healthcare in the south west of England.

 

Alternative treatments for depression Exercise and 'wake' therapy
James Hawkins MB, B.Chir.

Depression is the largest single cause of non-fatal disease burden worldwide.1 It accounts for nearly 12% of total days lived with disability. Following a BMJ identified weakness 2 in NICE'S guidelines on depression treatment, NICE has concluded that there is little current firm evidence that mild to moderate depression is responsive to antidepressant medication or specific psychological treatments. This article looks at emerging research suggesting that treatments involving exercise and sleep should be taken more seriously.

 

 

Holistic woman-centred maternity care: are we achieving it?
Denise Tiran MSc, RM, RGN, ADM, PCEA Director, Expectancy Ltd Expectant Parents? Complementary Therapies Consultancy; Honorary Lecturer, University of Greenwich, London

Maternity care should aim to help women achieve a personal experience of pregnancy, childbirth and early parenthood which is as safe and satisfying as possible. The need for care to be focused around the needs of the mother and her family has long been advocated, yet many women continue to be dissatisfied with their experiences of childbirth. This author argues that truly woman-centred holistic care remains a long way off. Therefore, midwifery must re-resist the inappropriate medicalisation of normal pregnancy and childbirth, and make it midwifery's primary aim to facilitate them.

 

Bridging practice: an integrative model of holistic care
Anne Cawthorn

Working as a nurse psychotherapist at the Christie Hospital has allowed me the opportunity to work as part of the team who were winners of the Prince of Wales's Award for Integrating CAM into Healthcare in 2003. This paper suggests a holistic model which conceptualises the approach adopted by the team, which has as its goal true integrative care.

 

Traditional Chinese medicine in NHS primary healthcare
Graeme McCracken BSc (Hon) TCM, MBAcC, Dip Qi Gong Tui Na, LCSP (Asso) Resident clinician, The Gateway Centre

The author presents an overview of the UK's only NHS-run Chinese medicine clinic.

 

 

 

 

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Journal of Holistic Healthcare
Issue 2.4 - March 2005
 

Does personal care and continuity matter in today's NHS?
David Peters, Editor in Chief, Journal of Holsitic Healthcare

The Michael Dixon (chair of the NHS Alliance) and Niall Dickson (chief executive of the King's Fund) debate was originally billed as Dixon v Dickson. However, having agreed that they did not disagree all that much, it became Dixon and Dickson. The following are extracts from their lively exchange.

 

Making holistic medical education happen
Trevor Thompson Clinical lecturer, Bristol

UMS CONFERENCE REPORT

 

Practical applied psychoneuroimmunology the endorphin effect
William Bloom Director of The Holism Network

CONFERENCE REPORT

 

Caring for carers - caring for ourselves
Dr Andrew Tresidder

CONFERENCE REPORT

 

Vitality-enhancing resources in nature Wildness and interaction with whales and dolphins
Volker Todt and Roma Spring Human-Dolphin Relationship Project, (HDRP), Germany

CONFERENCE REPORT

 

Burning out and finding fire Stress, burnout and the healthcare practitioner - the approach of the Sacred Space Foundation
Rev Professor Stephen G Wright Chairman,The Sacred Space Foundation

An extensive body of evidence points to high levels of stress and burnout among professional healthcare workers. Most efforts at rectifying the problem have tended to focus on structural and organisational matters. This paper argues that the issues are much deeper than this and reflects on the work of the Sacred Space Foundation.

 

 

 

 

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Journal of Holistic Healthcare
Issue 1.3 - November 2004
 

Beyond mind-body dualism: implications for patient care
David Beales MRCGP; FRCP(UK); DCH; DRCOG; DHyp/Psych. Director, Hearts and Minds

Many symptoms have no obvious cause, to the frustration of both patient and health professional. But if consultation aims to establish why self-regulation has been lost, the patient can actively participate in restoring their own health. Homeostatic self-regulation is central to diagnosis and treatment.

 

Cuba's green medicine The balm on the Achilles heel of Castro's revolution
Geoff D'Arcy Lic Ac, DOM

Born of necessity, Cuba has gone green, in both its healthcare and its farming. Now the neighbourhood pharmacy makes and sells alternative remedies, and prescriptions might sound like recipe ingredients. So how is this legendary healthcare system, previously dominated by science and conventional medicine, coping?

 

The T'ai Chi balancing act
Rochelle Wilson

Lack of mainstream funding has not stopped innovative staff at Sherwood Day Hospital in Nottingham offering T'ai Chi as part of its falls prevention programme. While the 'treatment' may not meet the exacting evidence base demanded by today's NHS, staff and patients are in no doubt about its value.

 

Diversity in the public arena: a crucial issue for holistic healthcare Frank Keating Senior Research Fellow, Sainsbury Centre for Mental Health

Diversity, positively diverse, managing diversity, equality, equality of opportunity are just a few among the plethora of terms that have been introduced to the public and policy agenda. What do we mean by these terms and what is its relevance to healthcare?

 

In search of diversity
Mike Waldron Head of Diversity, The Prince's Trust

The author explores the meaning of diversity, what it is and why we should value it. In doing so, he draws attention to the experiences of refugees and people from minority ethnic populations, highlighting the disadvantages they have in life in the UK. This inherently undermines a holistic approach to their healthcare. Practitioners need to make strenuous efforts to understand and engage with minority communities throughout the UK.

 

 

 

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Journal of Holistic Healthcare
Issue 1.2 - August 2004
 

The dangers and limitations of modern biomedical research
Paul Dieppe Director, Medical Research Council Health Services Research Collaboration, Department of Social Medicine, University of Bristol

In its quest for acceptability, CAM is being inappropriately drawn down the biomedical research route. Biomedicine and biomedical research are only a small part of the answer to our healthcare needs and CAM practitioners should resist these moves. CAM works in a different way and that is what needs to be accepted.

 

CAM regulation: integration or dis-integration?
Michael Lingard DO

We are at a critical evolutionary stage in our understanding and practice of medicine. A meeting of right and left sided brain perception, of eastern and western philosophies, the one dominated by Aristotle's 'binary' logic , the other by Buddha's 'fuzzy' logic. The one demands something 'is or is not', the other that something 'is and is not'. CAM belongs to the latter, modern medicine has been moulded to fit the former. There is space for modern medicine within CAM but not the reverse; attempts to integrate CAM into mainstream medicine will annihilate CAM.

 

The reflective practitioner in a community of enquiry: case study designs
David Aldridge PhD, Dr.med.habil, FRSM Chair of Qualitative Research in Medicine, University Witten Herdecke

Qualitative research is the poor relation of research studies. What is needed is flexibility in case study designs. From a rich and varied source of data theories can be generated. Far from being limiting, it is the fact that case studies are context-based that makes them important to, for instance, music therapy.

 

Emergent entanglement, love and being
Michael E Hyland PhD CPsychol. Professor of Health Psychology, School of Psychology, University of Plymouth

It is generally accepted that therapists have effects on patients in addition to the specific effects of their therapy. What is far more controversial is why therapists have the effects they do. This article describes the different explanations and provides some evaluation, and seeks to describe these explanations in a way which is accessible to practitioners and others.

 

A self support system for young doctors by young doctors
Beth Griggs Pre-registration House Officer

REALISE is a unique programme designed by junior doctors for junior doctors to provide an opportunity for individuals to realise their own potential and to manifest it in their life as a doctor, before cynicism and disillusionment takes hold.

 

 

 

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Journal of Holistic Healthcare
Issue 1.1 - May 2004
 

The human effect Time to take centre stage in the modern NHS
Michael Dixon MA, FRCGP

The author explores the human body and mind's ability to heal itself and the relationship of this to the placebo effect. He tries to unpick the overlap between healing and placebo and explores how patients can best be helped to maximise self-healing. Reductionism in the individual consultation and also in NHS policy must be balanced by a recognition that the 'human effect'must be an intrinsic ingredient in all NHS policy and implementation as it needs to be part of every frontline consultation.

 

Holism and interprofessional learning
Sue Morrison MA (HPE), FRCGP, MILT

We need to re-visit holistic attitudes in medicine and the approaches to managing health and illness that we developed 20 years ago. Sue Morrison argues that we should be looking at holism in its widest sense to encompass the working team and its environment. The Marylebone Health Centre is used as a case study.

 

Carson's syndrome. Environmental threat and opportunity for health in the 21st Century
Robin Stott FRCP, FFPH

Sustainability and health are closely related: many of the factors that shape and maintain the health of a society also determine its sustainability. These are highly significant overlaps, not least because a society's perceptions of health and the functioning of its healthcare systems can be more, or less, sustainable. Policymakers should be able to develop effective strategies for improving both sustainability and health. An awareness of how health and sustainability intersect can help individuals reach a better understanding of their own health, and help empower communities to take action.

 

The new GP contract The death of holism or a great leap forward?
Paul Thomas GP and professor of primary care research, education and development at Thames Valley University

The New General Practice Contract that took effect in April requires that practices gather data about their patients. The danger is that a preoccupation with data and diseases will kill holism. Conversely this might result in a flowering of holistic practice if data is used to empower people. Patients might become better able to gain holistic understandings by holding their own management plans, coupled with a map of how to negotiate the whole system. Data from practice computers could be interrogated locally to empower primary care professionals to see a bigger picture.

 

How CAM helps at acute cancer hospital
Peter Mackereth MA, RGN, Cert Ed. Dip (Nursing) Jacqui Stringer BSc, RGN,TIDHA, Senior Clinical Aromatherapist Barbara Lynch MBA, MIMGT, Improving Working Lives Coordinator Gwynneth Campbell BA, Project Leader Chair Massage for Carers

Christie Hospital started providing a complementary therapies service seven years ago, which has greatly expanded in the last three years. A 15-strong complementary therapy team now offers back and head massages, reflexology, acupuncture and other treatments for patients, their carers and staff. The paper reports on various aspects of the initiative using evaluation comments and case study reports to illustrate just how powerful the skilful use of touch therapies can be.

 

 

 

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