skip to content

Journal of Holistic Healthcare 2006-2007

  Issue 4.4 - Nov 2007

The power of touch: interview with Babette Rothschild - The new anatomy: is the ego more than skin deep? - The sense of touch: a philosophical surprise - the beautiful matrix (a picture special) - Touch therapies: the curious researcher - Breathing, chronic pain, touch ...

More information / get this edition

     
  Issue 4.3 - Aug 2007
Creativity and self-care: A good holistic practitioner - Autogenic training: a key component in holistic medical practice - Thinking beyond words: the power of the image - Herbal medicine in primary care - Complementary therapies and substance misuse...


More information / get this edition

     
  Issue 4.2 - May 2007
Medicine as if people matter - BHMA focus group The biopsychosocial model, and George Engel's view of the mind-body problem - The patient patient - Jan Alcoe Playing, reflecting and reality - Living as jazz - Mood enhancement by Indian head massage...

More information / get this edition
     
  Issue 4.1 - Feb 2007
Celebrating body and soul Paradigm lost - Hippocrates revisiting 21st century medicine - The Picture of Health - How bodies speak to one another - When the body remembers - Mindfulness pain management course at a GP surgery - Sex and the sacred...

More information / get this edition
     
  Issue 3.3 - August 2006
Heart and world The heart and positive emotion - The heart: more than just a pump - Healing the heart - A holistic approach to caring for people with heart failure - What are you? What am I? - Systems of flow in the body and on the planet...

More information / get this edition
     
  Issue 3.2 - May 2006
The arts in healthcare Art is not a brassiere - Current government policy: a charter for the art of medicine and holistic care? - Anthroposophical art therapy within the NHS - Rite of cancer (Thief of air) - Tim O'Leary Nell Dunn interview...

More information / get this edition
     
  Issue 3.1 - Feb 2006
Resilience in healthcare Doctors' resilience: can physicians heal themselves? - A vision of developing integrative care - Finding our own resilience: a personal account - Resilience and organisational change - Nurturing resilience: touch therapies in palliative care...


 

2011-2010  |  2009-2008  | 2007-2006 | 2005-2004 



BHMA member?
Download journals from Groupspaces

Not yet a member?
Join Now >

Journal of Holistic Healthcare
Issue 4.4 - November 2007
 

The body and its boundaries in therapeutic relationship
David Peters interviews body-psychotherapist Babette Rothschild

Mirroring is a fundamental human activity embedded in our neurobiology, and explains why practitioners may 'catch' emotions from their clients. So 'countertransference' is not just a psychological process: body to body communication involves the exchange of physical energies too, especially where bodywork is concerned. If bodyworkers are unclear about their own physical boundaries, they would do well to learn how to sense, create and use boundaries better, because effective therapy and the avoidance of harmful exchanges of intention and emotion depend on this ability.

 

The new anatomy: is the ego more than skin deep?
Roz Carroll UKCP registered body psychotherapist

The ego - our sense of self - arises out of the body. Sense input from skin and muscles creates the boundary and schema for the body-mind to make sense of itself. The infant's skin ego is bound up with touch, and with the comfort and contact needed for it to feel good inside its skin. The mother's body enables the baby's to regulate itself. As voluntary control of movement develops, the muscle ego, which can deal with the world of objects, and tolerate separateness, emerges.

 

Craniosacral touch and the perception of inherent health
Howard Evans Part-time lecturer, University of Westminster

Certain kinds of touch therapy, but craniosacral therapy par excellance, depend on a highly developed sensitivity to subtle shifts in bodily tensions and rhythms. The craniosacral therapist learns to sense still points in this flow. In the therapeutic relationship - for psychotherapists as well as bodyworkers - less can often be more. Effective psychotherapists develop their ability to quietly notice and contain emotions that their clients cannot. Similarly, sensitive body therapists, by stilling themselves, may contact and mobilise the body-mind's inherent potential for self-healing. Key words: Relaxation, inherent health, stillness, breath of life

 

The sense of touch - a philosophical surprise
Bevis Nathan Osteopath

Touch is the most basic way of experiencing the world. But touching cannot be comprehended in a generic theory of the senses, because in many ways it is distinct from the other four. These differences are crucial enough to suggest that tactility (the felt sense) is the basis for a better model of body perception and emotion. A phenomenological view of flesh-as-lived provides insights into the nature of feelings and empathy, and suggests ways for improving our understanding of human constitution and therapeutic relationships.

 

Touch therapies: the curious researcher
Peter Mackereth Clinical lead in complementary therapies, Christie Hosptial

In this paper the author shares his own journey of 'becoming curious'and respectful of the complexities of touch therapies, in particular their effects on mind and body. It is an encouragement to others to investigate and explore their work. Examples of touch therapy research projects are given and a Yin Yang approach to research thinking suggested. Key words: curiosity, research, touch

 

Breathing, chronic pain, touch and the body-mind
Leon Chaitow ND DO Honorary Fellow, School of Integrated Health, University of Westminster

Many people present in primary care with persistent unexplained physical symptoms. Patients with functional somatic syndrome include those 'diagnosed' with fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome, and chronic pelvic pain. The current understanding of such complex multisymptomatic conditions is explored. A brief overview is offered of a common maintaining feature of FSS ? breathing pattern disorder - its effects, and an approach to its treatment.

 

 

 

 

Join the BHMA mailing list now
You will also be contacted by us
about becoming a full member.

 



BHMA member?
Download journals from Groupspaces

Not yet a member?
Join Now >

Journal of Holistic Healthcare
Issue 4.3 - August 2007

A good holistic practitioner. Lewis Morgan

A short story by a third year medical student influenced by his perception of what holism is, and how even in the busy life of a physician it is possible to retain a holistic attitude.

Seeing through the whole: the need for super...vision
David Owen MB BS FFHom

For psychotherapists it is a clinical fact of life that 'suppressed' elements in the therapeutic relationship - things unspoken, unheard or unspeakable - make encounters with particular patients 'difficult'. Homeopathy too requires a technically complete picture of a patient's 'case' – of their constitution and the process of their illness. Yet these aspects too are often 'supressed'. A homeopathic doctor explores the interconnected causes and consequences of 'suppression' and explains how supervision can make practitioners' and patients' stories more whole.

 

Autogenic training: a key component in holistic medical practice
Ruth T Naylor BA MS MBA (Hons, Health Care Management, USPHS Fellow) AA (Hons, Studio Arts) DipAT Dr Janet Marshall MB BS DipAT

The use of stress management methods in holistic practice is on the increase. In the 2007 Spring issue of Heart Health, Susan Noble, 61, a heart attack patient, told how her autogenic training practice gave her a 'calmer state of mind' and enabled her to take control of her recovery. 1 This paper offers a brief description of the multi-component autogenic training process, and specific examples of how the authors work as autogenic therapists.

 

Thinking beyond words: the power of the image
Jila Peacock Jila Peacock is a medical member of Disability Living Allowance appeal tribunals. She is based in Glasgow. Her book 'Ten Poems from Hafez' is published by Sylph Editions www.sylpheditions.com

Doctor turned artist Jila Peacock has turned the poems of Hafez, the 14th century Persian poet, into a beautifully crafted book of shape poems. Here she charts the journey from one vocation to another, and we reprint two of the poems. 'Just how important is this freeing of the unconscious mind, of the 'inner self', in allowing us to heal?'

 

Herbal medicine in primary care
Max Drake Bsc MNIMH

As the practice of herbal medicine (HM) moves towards statutory regulation, many herbalists in the UK are hoping this could allow them to form closer ties with the NHS. This, they believe, would make HM more accessible to those most likely to benefit from it.A unique herbalism service working within the NHS is described here.

 

Complementary therapies and substance misuse
Lyn Hill, Jill Allott and Carole Gunning

Complementary therapies are offered as part of regular treatment at Project 6, a voluntary drug and alcohol agency. Although anecdotally effective, the therapists wanted to establish an evidence base. Their research study followed 61 service users and concluded that the treatments are effective (as defined within the National Treatment Agency's treatment agenda). Complementary therapies, the authors say, should be part of all drug and alcohol services.

 

 

 

 

 

Join the BHMA mailing list now
You will also be contacted by us
about becoming a full member.

 



BHMA member?
Download journals from Groupspaces

Not yet a member?
Join Now >

Journal of Holistic Healthcare
Issue 4.2 - May 2007
 
The biopsychosocial model, and George Engel's view of the mind-body problem
Dr F Borrell-Carri Department of Clinical Sciences, University of Barcelona Professor David Peters School of Integrated Health, University of Westminster

George Engel believed that clinicians must attend to the psychological and social dimensions of illness. Although his biopsychosocial model 1 for a time influenced mainstream medical thought and practice, medicine has continued to emphasise the biology of disease. This article considers the mind-body problem and concludes that as advances in neurobiology elucidate mind-body processes, the standing of Engel's revolutionary insights will be restored.

 The patient patient
Jan Alcoe Writer and facilitator in health and social care

This is a reflective account on the value of patience in coping with illness, promoting self-healing and supporting the relationship between patient and healthcare-giver. The importance of one's core values as a valuable resource at a time of serious illness is considered.

 Playing, reflecting and reality
Caroline Schuck BA RSHom and Jane Wood BA RSHom

An innovative mode of supervision and reflective workshops encourages self-learning. The method is described here, with an account of how it leads practitioners to find creative solutions and their own pathways to esolutions.

 Living as jazz
David Aldridge PhD, Dr med habil, FRSM, Chair of Qualitative Research in Medicine, University of Witten Herdecke

The 'act' of living is an improvised performance. Neurological injury impairs this performance: communication suffers - we lose our powers of timing and co-ordination. Dialogue need not be based on language, however: like jazz it is improvised. Music therapy enables dialogue to resume.

 

Mood enhancement by Indian head massage Neil Morris C. Psychol, Senior lecturer, University of Wolverhampton Sharon Wickes BSc (Hons), Crisis Resolution Intervention Service, Parklands Hospital

We strive to maintain positive mood states but often do this by means that may be physically harmful to us, for example, by excessively drinking alcohol. However there are many possibilities for improving mood that do not create a conflict between the maintenance of both physical and psychological wellbeing. The results of our study showed that although participants did not experience a sense of being energised they had enhanced hedonic tone and markedly reduced tension.

 

 

 

 

Join the BHMA mailing list now
You will also be contacted by us
about becoming a full member.

 



BHMA member?
Download journals from Groupspaces

Not yet a member?
Join Now >

Journal of Holistic Healthcare
Issue 4.1 - Feb 2007
 

Hippocrates revisiting 21st century medicine
Dr Mabel Aghadiuno MRCGP MSc MFHom Locum GP and homeopathic physician

What would Hippocrates make of today's medical ethical minefield? Is the Hippocratic oath relevant to today, or is it rendered irrelevant by scientific developments and the possibilities that modern medicine now offers? And should we grasp everything that science makes possible without considering the implications for humanity and the future?

 

The Picture of Health
Dr Rosy Daniel BSc MBBCh Integrated medicine consultant

The Picture of Health assessment tool can be used to get a quick snapshot of a person's wellbeing - or lack of it. It is based on 12 principles covering four areas - body, mind, spirit and environment. Although developed for use within a broader programme, it can be used as a stand-alone tool by practitioners in a range of settings to help assess an individual's health needs and risk factors.

 

How bodies speak to one another
Roz Carroll UKCP registered body psychotherapist

Science proposes a new view that unifies body and soul.The work of Jaak Panksepp and Allan Schore encourages us to see humans compassionately as creatures whose feelings and brains are deeply rooted not only in their evolutionary past but in the cradle too. Panksepp proposes how and why basic emotions evolved, and describes their bodily foundation. Allan Schore considers how the relationship between the young baby and mother sets a thermostat that regulates the brain's connection with the autonomic nervous system, and so determines how the adult will respond to emotions, trauma and stress.

 

When the body remembers
Emerald-Jane Turner

This article outlines the work that took place with people after the London bombings of July 2005 and the group approach that was used. The method I used was based on a body-centred approach to post-traumatic stress that is more generally applied in one-to-one trauma therapy.1-3 This article is about our experience of applying it to groups by modifying the method appropriately. In the context of working inside an organisation which had been subjected to an enormously traumatic, tragic and heroic event, there were real advantages to working collectively.

 

Mindfulness pain management course at a GP surgery
Linda Loganathan MA Reiki Master

Mindfulness meditation has been shown to help people with chronic pain. Setting up a course for patients in a GP practice is an innovation that presents challenges for all concerned - patients, practitioner and GP. However patient feedback showed much benefit despite some initial resistance.

 

Sex and the sacred - the Tantric path to blissful sex
Dr Rosy Daniel BSc MBBCh Integrated medicine consultant

The BHMA's annual conference in December was titled Celebrating Body and Soul. Befitting this theme, Dr Rosy Daniel, better known for her work at the Bristol Cancer Help Centre (1985?1999) and Health Creation (1999 to the present) (see page 13), kicked off the day with a personal account of her discovery of the Tantric path to blissful sex. Here she explains its background and what it means to her.

 

 

 

 

Join the BHMA mailing list now
You will also be contacted by us
about becoming a full member.

 



BHMA member?
Download journals from Groupspaces

Not yet a member?
Join Now >

Journal of Holistic Healthcare
Issue 3.3 - August 2006
 

The heart and positive emotion - from concept to measurement
Tony Yardley-Jones Director of Occupational Health, Consultant in Occupational Medicine, Royal Berkshire Hospital

Throughout history and across diverse cultures, religions, and spiritual traditions, the heart has been associated with spiritual influx, wisdom, and emotional experience, particularly with regard to other-centred, positive emotions such as love, care, compassion, and appreciation. Research provides evidence that the heart does indeed play a role in the generation of emotional experience, suggesting that these longsurviving associations may be more than merely metaphorical. Here a model of emotion that includes the heart, together with the brain, nervous, and hormonal systems, as fundamental components, is reviewed.

 

The heart - more than just a pump
Maxwell Fraval DO, MOSc (Paed), Anu Norrie DO, Grad Dip (Osteo Paed), Pilar Munoz B App Sc (Osteo), Grad Dip (Osteo Paed)

Dr Andrew Taylor Still, the founder of osteopathy, saw the role of the heart as central to human physiology. He felt that it imparted 'knowledge' to the blood, an idea further developed by Paul Pearsall who recognised that the heart has memory and 'a voice which will speak to us if we are prepared to listen'.Are these just pretty metaphors, or is there now scientific evidence that the heart's information field helps control brain activity, and that it may be encoded hormonally, electrically and rhythmically, to be delivered to the extracellular matrix and ultimately to every cell in the body?

 

Healing the heart
Harvey Zarren MD, FACC Medical Director, Healing Your Heart program, NSMC Union Hospital, Lynn, MA, USA Assistant Clinical Professor,Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA 

Key points - 1. Modern healthcare has become progressively less about people, wellness and the quality of the human experience of healthcare and more about technology and finance. 2. Cardiovascular disease is the number one killer of Americans and soon of all people on the planet. Cardiovascular disease is at least 90% from modifiable risk factors and yet most effort and investment is in intervention rather than prevention. 3. Time and relationship skills are key to good quality healthcare.There is currently little focus on either. 4. Healing your heart is an example of a people-oriented programme that focuses on wholeness, healing and the effects of supportive relationship and group interaction to enhance the quality of people's journeys toward wellness.

 

A holistic approach to caring for people with heart failure
Mary Brice Heart failure nurse consultant, British Heart Foundation

The British Heart Foundation is pioneering a community-based heart failure nursing service. Where patients have complex needs, nurses adopt a case manager role to coordinate services and provide a holistic approach. How this works is illustrated with two cases, one involving palliative care.

 

Art, science and an integrative view of the heart
Philip J Kilner

There has been an integrative artistic-scientific movement for more than two centuries. The author traces its origins and its influence in the biological sciences, fluid dynamics and studies of heart form and function.

 

Salivary cortisol, stress and arousal following five weeks training in kinesthetic meditation to undergraduate students
Valerie Bullen, Cathrine Fredhoi,William Bloom, Jan Povey, Frank Hucklebridge, Phil Evans, Angela Clow

In an investigation designed to explore the impact of a fiveweek kinesthetic meditation training programme, healthy undergraduate students were allocated to either a control (CG: n=26) or intervention (IG: n=31) group. Salivary cortisol, stress and arousal were measured before and after the five weeks, during which the IG could attend kinesthetic meditation training sessions for one hour each week as well as practice at home with the aid of a CD.There were no statistically significant differences between the groups in demographics or any of the measures at the start of the investigation. Cortisol secretion in the IG group was lower on the day of the final kinesthetic meditation session compared to on a typical day in the same week and the CG measured in the same week.At the end of the five weeks the IG reported more arousal compared to at the start of the programme, whereas the CG reported less. These data confirm that a brief period of kinesthetic meditation training can improve subjective and objective measures of wellbeing.

 

Matters of the heart: an evidence based overview of mind-body medicine in cardiovascular disease
Kenneth R. Pelletier PhD, MD (hc) Clinical Professor of Medicine, University of Arizona School of Medicine and University of California School of Medicine (UCSF) San Francisco

Mind-body medicine should now be considered more conventional than alternative, so widespread is its use. It can help a variety of conditions and trial results should spur practitioners to use MBIs as a firstline choice for moderate hypertension in patients with cardiac heart disease.

 

A change of heart The dynamics of psychological resistance and emergence in self-managed mind-body healthcare
William Bloom PhD

Though the mind-body connection is increasingly recognised as a therapeutic resource, therapies that tap into it can trigger psychological dynamics of resistance.These dynamics affect both the individual who tries to implement mind-body healthcare, and the practitioner who is enabling it. The suggestion of this paper is that mind-body healthcare requires a substantial transformation in an individual's worldview and sense of identity. Consequently it may be better understood as a dramatic transformational process involving psychological death and birth, rather than the simple acquisition of some selfcare techniques. Therefore practitioners may require particular skills when they seek to guide their clients towards autonomy.

 

 

 

 

 

Join the BHMA mailing list now
You will also be contacted by us
about becoming a full member.

 

 

 

 

 

 



BHMA member?
Download journals from Groupspaces

Not yet a member?
Join Now >

Journal of Holistic Healthcare
Issue 3.2 - May 2006
 

Art is not a brassiere
Harry Cayton National Director for Patients & the Public, Department of Health

The arts have a central role in the healing process, and there is a substantial body of evidence on their role. However its quality varies greatly and while different types of evidence are helpful, a consistent approach, better information about the research and better access to it is to be encouraged.

 

Current government policy - a charter for the art of medicine and holistic care?
Dr Michael Dixo
n FRCGP GP, Senior Associate, King's Fund and Hon Senior Fellow in Public Policy, HMSC Birmingham

The future of primary care is in the hands of GPs, now more than ever with the latest wave of government policy and practice based commissioning. GPs have to grasp the nettle and make the opportunities for holistic consultations.

 

Anthroposophical art therapy within the NHS
Hazel Adams

The Blackthorn Trust was founded as a charity to enable anthroposophical 1 approaches to medicine and therapy to be integrated into the NHS. Patients, many of whom feel they have no artistic ability, find a liberating and renewing experience as their medical paths may reach their limits.

 

Creative words for health
Larry Butler ADHD

The use of art in health promotion and wellbeing is on the increase.The benefits include more compassionate doctors, reduced dependence on drugs, patient empowerment and increased confidence and self reliance. The practical examples of creative projects written about here show how this is achieved.

 

Working with movement and dance in healthcare
Dr Alan Kellas MBBS, BA, DGM, MRCPsych.

I have written this article about the place of movement awareness and dance in health settings, in the hope of offering an insight into my clinical work as an NHS consultant community psychiatrist for adults with learning disability (LD). My job has its medical neuropsychiatric and social aspects, but a core part of it is to be able to tune into unspoken experiences and nonverbal communications which words and journals like this can only hint at.

 

Normalisation of salivary cortisol levels and self-report stress by a brief lunchtime visit to an art gallery by London City workers
Angela Clow PhD with Cathrine Fredhoi MSc Department of Psychology, University of Westminster

We studied the impact of a brief lunchtime visit to an art gallery on City workers? levels of the stress hormone cortisol as well as self-report levels of stress and arousal.  Average levels of cortisol and self-report stress were significantly reduced by the visit, levels of arousal were unchanged. On arrival at the gallery levels of cortisol were elevated relative to expected values. Following the gallery visit the cortisol concentrations had normalised to those expected for the time of day. The observed drop in cortisol was rapid and substantial; under normal circumstances it would take about 5 hours of normal diurnal decline for cortisol levels to fall to this extent. We conclude that the gallery visit caused rapid normalisation (recovery) from the consequences of high stress.

 

Playing the doctor
Phil Hammond GP, writer and performer

Do doctors act, and if so what does that mean? Are we role-players parroting the same dreary advice whatever the circumstance, or performers who adapt and interact according to the audience? And would we be better doctors if we polished our performance rather than submitting to the mind-numbing conformity of medicine by guideline? Or is this all self-indulgent pap?

 

Is there a place for the arts in medical education?
John Salinsky GP and course organiser,Whittington vocational training scheme for general practice

Why teach young trainee GPs classic art and literature? Will it make them better doctors or is it a valuable exercise in itself ? art for art's sake? And why concentrate on the classics rather than popular art? Here the author describes his work with trainee GPs and why the arts play a crucial role.

 

 

 

 

Join the BHMA mailing list now
You will also be contacted by us
about becoming a full member.

 



BHMA member?
Download journals from Groupspaces

Not yet a member?
Join Now >

Journal of Holistic Healthcare
Issue 3.1 - Feb 2006
 

THERE IS NO CONTENT FOR THIS MONTH. following text is placeholder only
David Peters interviews body-psychotherapist Babette Rothschild

Mirroring is a fundamental human activity embedded in our neurobiology, and explains why practitioners may 'catch' emotions from their clients. So 'countertransference' is not just a psychological process: body to body communication involves the exchange of physical energies too, especially where bodywork is concerned. If bodyworkers are unclear about their own physical boundaries, they would do well to learn how to sense, create and use boundaries better, because effective therapy and the avoidance of harmful exchanges of intention and emotion depend on this ability.

 

The new anatomy: is the ego more than skin deep?
Roz Carroll UKCP registered body psychotherapist

The ego - our sense of self - arises out of the body. Sense input from skin and muscles creates the boundary and schema for the body-mind to make sense of itself. The infant's skin ego is bound up with touch, and with the comfort and contact needed for it to feel good inside its skin. The mother's body enables the baby's to regulate itself. As voluntary control of movement develops, the muscle ego, which can deal with the world of objects, and tolerate separateness, emerges.

 

Craniosacral touch and the perception of inherent health
Howard Evans Part-time lecturer, University of Westminster

Certain kinds of touch therapy, but craniosacral therapy par excellance, depend on a highly developed sensitivity to subtle shifts in bodily tensions and rhythms. The craniosacral therapist learns to sense still points in this flow. In the therapeutic relationship - for psychotherapists as well as bodyworkers - less can often be more. Effective psychotherapists develop their ability to quietly notice and contain emotions that their clients cannot. Similarly, sensitive body therapists, by stilling themselves, may contact and mobilise the body-mind's inherent potential for self-healing. Key words: Relaxation, inherent health, stillness, breath of life

 

The sense of touch - a philosophical surprise
Bevis Nathan Osteopath

Touch is the most basic way of experiencing the world. But touching cannot be comprehended in a generic theory of the senses, because in many ways it is distinct from the other four. These differences are crucial enough to suggest that tactility (the felt sense) is the basis for a better model of body perception and emotion. A phenomenological view of flesh-as-lived provides insights into the nature of feelings and empathy, and suggests ways for improving our understanding of human constitution and therapeutic relationships.

 

Touch therapies: the curious researcher
Peter Mackereth Clinical lead in complementary therapies, Christie Hosptial

In this paper the author shares his own journey of 'becoming curious'and respectful of the complexities of touch therapies, in particular their effects on mind and body. It is an encouragement to others to investigate and explore their work. Examples of touch therapy research projects are given and a Yin Yang approach to research thinking suggested. Key words: curiosity, research, touch

 

Breathing, chronic pain, touch and the body-mind
Leon Chaitow ND DO Honorary Fellow, School of Integrated Health, University of Westminster

Many people present in primary care with persistent unexplained physical symptoms. Patients with functional somatic syndrome include those 'diagnosed' with fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome, and chronic pelvic pain. The current understanding of such complex multisymptomatic conditions is explored. A brief overview is offered of a common maintaining feature of FSS ? breathing pattern disorder - its effects, and an approach to its treatment.

 

 

 

 

Join the BHMA mailing list now
You will also be contacted by us
about becoming a full member.

 

 

Website by diditon.com